Over the course of their careers, bands will experience their ups and downs, trials and tribulations, but it’s not what a band goes through that defines them, it’s how they choose to overcome those obstacles. The Devil Wears Prada has had their fair share of challenges and difficulties, choosing to push forward regardless. Transit Blues, the band’s sixth full-length album (Rise Records) will be the first album recorded without drummer Daniel Williams, as well as the first full-length with guitarist Kyle Sipress. What could prove to be a make or break moment in their career, The Devil Wears Prada ran full speed ahead and came out swinging.

Last winter, Prada retreated to Watertown, WI and Sawyer, MI to write the new album, making this the first time the band both lived and created in a shared, full-time space. They called on producer Dan Korneff (Pierce the Veil, Motionless in White) to help record the album in Spring of 2016. The end result? An 11-track, beautifully written album with reoccurring themes of separation, transition, and mourning. Not only is this some of Prada’s best lyrical content, but the way the music emphasizes vocalist’s Mike Hranica’s words brings forth an added layer of connection that fans will truly enjoy.

The first track, “Pure Poison” wastes no time jumping in to Prada’s heavier side, while “Worldwide” starts us off with a creepier beginning that is quick to grab your attention with a catchy chorus you’ll be singing along to before the end of the track. While a lot of Prada’s lyrical work is derived from fiction and literature, “Lock & Load” discusses the real-life problem of gun control, and may not be a favorite for their more conservative fans. The driving force behind this song is anger, giving it an unsettling feeling appropriate for the subject matter. Avid Prada fans will be pleased to know “Home for Grave II” is a continuation of the story that began on Prada’s 8:18 album. The album concludes with title track, “Transit Blues” talking about anxiety and panic attack disorder, and ending on a keyboard outro that is both haunting and beautiful.

Each track on the new album has it’s own distinct way of pulling you in and maintaining that attention throughout the course of the song, whether that be through builds or breakdowns. The familiarity of The Devil Wears Prada is evident in each track but this album in it’s entirety places Prada on a whole new level. The band took the hand they had been dealt and not only rose to the challenge, but exceeded it. Transit Blues is a new era for The Devil Wears Prada, one that fans both new and old will enjoy.

The Devil Wears Prada will release Transit Blues on October 7th, and kick off their U.S. Tour October 11th.

 

You can watch the video for their first single, “Daughter” below: